Tag Archives: vintage kitchen

1950’s Kelvinator Stove For Sale $500.00 – Denver, Colorado

Jim emailed me last week about finding out some information on his 1950’s 30″ Kelvinator electric stove. (The 30″ standard size vintage stoves aren’t as easy to come by as the larger stoves of era).

It’s up for sale for $500.00 in Denver, Colorado.

Jim says, “It was purchased new in the 1950’s and put in service. The original owner sold the house including appliances to a single woman in the mid 1960’s.

The range has had two owners, we are now the third.”

This vintage range is in fantastic condition and has been working for all these years. It has the broiler in the oven and a utility drawer on the bottom.

I like it because it has the extra work space in the middle and is a simple, classic style which is easy to maintain.

This stove looks to be a 1952 or there abouts. Here’s a few ads I found on the web –

From Farm Home Life

And this 1952 ad from hmdavid on flickr –

Kelvinator Oven Ad 1952

You can contact Jim at jrpeay@vantageco.net or me at antiquevintage forum@gmail.com for more information.


Vintage Stove Parts – 54monroe

OK people! I’m done with blogging about Vintage White Kitchens (for a bit). Let’s move on to some vintage appliance stuff.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



Gaffers and Sattler Stove Knobs

Today on ebay I found a great resource for vintage appliance parts, 54monroe. First I looked at his feedback – looked great. Then I browsed his inventory. Good selection of knobs, grates, griddles, switches and controls clocks and more.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



O’Keefe and Merritt Burner Grates

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



Chamber’s Stove Therm-o-Well 1/2 Pan

The more, might be this 1950’s O’Keefe and Merritt for $249.00 Buy It Now. Lovin that yellow. Lovin that price.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



I needed to find out more so I sent him a message. Here’s what Steve wrote back – “As you see i have a little bit of everything and a whole lot of some stuff. My eBay store is VINTAGE STOVE PARTS and I have a one page info only web site www.vintagestoveparts.com

I am in the Los Angeles area and have been selling appliance parts for 35 years and collecting stoves since 1990. I have about 30 gas stoves.

I have been on eBay about 3 years. I have not been parting out my collection to auction off in pieces…all the items I have are on the shelf.

I have mostly O’Keefe & Merritt, Wedgewood, Chambers, Magic Chef and Tappan on the gas ranges. Frigidaire, GE, Tappan and Thermador on the electric.

Steve also sent me a picture of one of my favorites. A 1939 6301 Magic Chef. It is a to-die-for stove. 8 burners, multiple ovens and that sweet bread warming cubby at the top.

Here’s what’s on his website – If you don’t find what you need in my Store please email me with your request.Include clear photos. I list only a few of the items I have available for sale and have a huge inventory ready to ship. Please try to request only non-eBay items. I do not end eBay auctions early or sell eBay items direct. Local pick up available for Southern California customers. Email me at okmguy@yahoo.com

Glad I found him. I know everyone is always looking for those “hard-to-find” parts.

Here’s a picture one of Steve’s other stove, an O’Keefe and Merritt. It’s a beauty.


The White Vintage Kitchen – Creative Storage



I am going through a “white period”. A cleansing if you will.

Over a year ago we had a major downsizing.

Our old house was antique country/westerny. We have moved in to the 1940’s “casita” (little house). A charming 2 bedroom, 1 bath with a room off the garage which we turned into a “crash pad” for our wayward adult kids.

Yes, I need to take pictures!

Because of life (getting old and having hubby “health issues” suck) I haven’t done one thing inside this house!! Not one nail in the wall. Didn’t change the ugly, country blue checked fro-fro contact paper in the kitchen cabinets. OK, I’m coming out of a decorating depression.

The stuff is here but I am stuck! Me….a woman with no style!

Oh, did I mention we inherited a beautiful flourishing flower/veggie garden. I HAVE been doing something. I am coming out of my decorating coma…….

I’m really leaning towards doing everything that cottage white.

Yes Mike, I know this is Tucson. Yes Mike, I know it’s the desert. Yes Mike, I know white gets dirty. Yes Mike, I will be wanting to use all the vintage linen. Yes Mike, I will be painting everything in sight white.

Here’s some Vintage White –

Love this dresser without the drawers….might find it as “road kill” on the side of the road.

Source: reinventedkb.com via Jan on Pinterest



Jars are hot, buttons are hot and jars with white buttons are steaming hot.



What about this wood letter holder (of coarse I’d paint it white) to hold dishes?



Tin Cans….



Serving dish storage –



Ikea CD storage for pantry items –

Source: designsponge.com via Jan on Pinterest



How sweet is this?


A Little Vintage Red for the Kitchen



Happy Valentine’s Day!

About RED – Red is the warmest of all colors. Red is the color most chosen by extroverts and one of the top picks of males. On the negative side red can mean temper or anger. In China, red is the color of prosperity and joy. Brides wear red and front doors are often painted red. Red is Tuesday’s color. Red roses symbolize passionate love. Ruby rings should be worn on the left hand. Red is the color of Mars. This planet is known as the God of War.
Red Energy

Red is associated with fiery heat and warmth. It can also mean danger (burning).

Red is the color of blood, and as such has strong symbolism as life and vitality. It brings focus to the essence of life and living with emphasis on survival. Red is also the color of passion and lust.







Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: manolohome.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: Uploaded by user via Jan on Pinterest







Source: bing.com via Jan on Pinterest


The Kelvinator Food-a-Rama



1955 Kelvinator Food-a-Rama Commercial

I am doing an appraisal for someone in Texas and thought I’d show some of the fab things I found.

Check out these pics from 1955 at Disneyland – Nash, Rambler & Kelvinator Circarama (motion picture in a-round)



Source: flickriver.com via Jan on Pinterest



See those Food-a-Rama’s in the back – how cool?

What about this Disney Story Board –



Visit Kevin Kidney’s Blog for more Disney – Food-a Rama stuff


A White Vintage Kitchen




One of my favorite looks for a kitchen is Vintage and White.

Can a kitchen have that “dreamy” feel? Is it a look that can be easily updated with a current trend? Will it look fresh in 10 or 15 years? I say “Yes!”




It can be shabby chic, french country, primitive or country/western.
A white background can be a starting palette of fabulous design and function.

Source: cococozy.com via Jan on Pinterest





With a few accessory changes, you can add the newest trends and then dump them when they grow tired. Just go back to the white canvas and start fresh.



See more on my Pinterest board Vintage White Kitchen

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest



Lovin the Vintage White Look….more articles….

From Country Living – The Insider’s Guide to Decorating with White

From http://www.kitchenbuilding.comPainting Old Country Cabinets White


Vintage Red Kitchen in Iowa




While searching on flickr for something I stumbled on to Barry and Maria Stahl’s 2008 kitchen remodel. I’m a sucker for vintage, I saw that Detroit Vapor Stove on that tile wall with 1913 and I was hooked.

“We are in New Albin, a tiny town (population about 450) at the very, very northeast corner of the state, right on the Mississippi River at the MN/IA border. The house was built in 1913, as best we can tell, so next year is its 100th birthday. It was constructed of cinderblock for the first floor and wood frame for the second. It has lots of sets of windows in sets of 3s. We have lived in the house since 2002. It’s been through many remodels and has been at various times a single family home, a boarding house, a shop and eventually home to a little old lady who blocked off the upstairs and lived in just 4 rooms of the main floor.”



In 2006 on her blog Shallow Thoughts From Iowa  Maria said about her kitchen – “horrible 1970s patterned vinyl floor covering that just about blinds you, and if it doesn’t, slowly drives you insane, a la Charlotte Perkins Gilman‘s The Yellow Wallpaper crossed with the patterned carpet at the Overlook Hotel in Stephen King’s The Shining

b) crumbling plaster and a hole where a doorway used to be (it’s only closed permanently on the other side, the kitchen side has studs)

c) the ugliest cabinets you ever did see, made of warping particle board frames and PLASTIC (yes, you read that right) drawers that are falling apart

Here’s a few pics of the kitchen before renovation.








“We had an old oil furnace that was in terrible shape. We wanted to replace it with geothermal heat, a ground source, closed loop system. We got all the quotes for it and went to the bank. The crazy thing was, it would not raise the appraised value of our house enough to justify another loan, and we didn’t have the cash. But, our banker told us, if we redid the awful kitchen, that would add enough value to justify a loan for both the kitchen and the geothermal system! So that’s what we did. I got my dream kitchen and we got a reliable, fairly “green” method of heating the house. Oh, and we got central air out of the deal, too.

The kitchen was nice and roomy, but had a total of 4 doorways, so it ended up being mostly trafficways. We closed one of the doorways, which gave us a nice big L shape along 2 walls for cabinets and fixtures. It made all the difference. I had bought a 1930s Detroit Vapor gas stove at a garage sale in Bangor, Wisconsin, years ago, and we designed the kitchen around it. It’s the second thing people exclaim over when they walk into the room, right after “Wow! Everything’s so red!”

The ceiling is now red painted beaded board, the same color as the cabinets. I’m a tall woman, 5 foot 11, so I love having high cabinets for all my treasures. I have lots of vintage enamelware and kitchen gadgets on top of the cabinets (more than in the Flickr photos, it’s really gotten kind of excessive now – ha!). It’s a very nice kitchen for 2 cooks to work, as there is plenty of counter space.

The floors are local hard maple, cut, cured and milled by our local sawmill, Konkel Hardwoods. John Pitts made the cabinets. The sink is from IKEA, and my husband did all the tile work.”














Here’s how it all came together and the “red” is fantastic! And that Detroit Vapor Stove. And all the vintage kitchen collectables on the shelves. And that “1913” tile work!!














Thanks to The Stahl’s for letting us visit your kitchen. Visit Maria’s blog Shallow Thoughts from Iowa and her site Sweet Gal Decals.




Holly Abston in Romantic Country Magazine

My Vintage Kitchen Stove (chambers c model) when we first built, we've upgraded the counters since.

Last year I did a post about artist, Holly Abston’s darling jadeite kitchen.

I found Holly’s fabulous kitchen while searching for Chambers stoves. She has a beauty!

Her darling house and art was featured in the spring edition of the 2012 Romantic Country Magazine. On sale now.

Congratulations Holly. Still lovin that stove!

Source: hollyabston.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: hollyabston.com via Jan on Pinterest

Visit Holly’s site www.hollyabston.com for a look into her beautiful world and illustrations!


Part 5 – The Hoosier Manufacturing Company 1920’s

Hoosier ad in LHJ March 1930
Ladies Home Journal March 1930 from sweetgaldecals on Flickr

Source: amazon.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: slumberland.org via Jan on Pinterest

Picture from www.Slumberland.org Some great kitchen designs from 1900’s

By 1916 other manufacturers started making their own versions of Hoosier style cupboards. McDougall, Sellers, Napanee, Sears, Roebuck & Co. are just a few.

Kitchen design started changing. Paint and tile started to be used for easy cleaning. The Hoosier Cabinet worktops (originally wood) became aluminum and “porceliron” (porcelain-enameled steel), then exclusively porceliron.

Hoosier had sold over a million cabinets by the 1920’s. They expanded with tables, chairs, sideboards and a clever stool that, when flipped over, became a stepladder.

Source: swagbucks.com via Jan on Pinterest

 

 

For a dollar down and a dollar a week you could have a Hoosier Cabinet in your kitchen. If there wasn’t a dealer near you, they’d deliver. They had a Hoosier Cabinet Club you could join, a kitchen plan book (free with purchase),  a Hoosier Council of Kitchen Scientists. These people were advertising masters.

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest


Part 2 – 1900 The Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The who’s and how’s of the Hoosier Cabinet’s start are a bit conflicting.

On the youtube video we’re led to believe the Hoosier was invented by J.S. McQuinn who sold farming supplies. The dates and occupations of the owners of The Hoosier Manufacturing Company aren’t jiving for me but we’re pushing on.

I see some smart businessmen including J. S. McQuinn joining together to form the company. The stockholders and officers were: President, J. M. Maring (of Muncie); vice-president, T. F. Hart (of Muncie) and secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn.

Here’s what I found about J.S. McQuinn from Biography Of Henry County, Indiana B. F. Bowen 1920.

“The secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn, was born in Fayette County, Illinois, and was there reared and educated.

In 1886 he went to Findlay, Ohio, for the purpose of engaging in window glass manufacturing, and remained there for seven years.

In 1894 he went to Albany, Indiana, where in 1896, he organized the Albany State Bank, was elected its cashier and remained in that position for four years. While in the bank his attention was called to the kitchen cabinet and, seeing the fine opportunity open to the person who should take hold of its manufacture, he sold his interest in the bank and concentrated his energies upon the manufacture of this article.

That his judgment at that time was not at fault is attested by the wonderful success, which has attended the enterprise. The growth of the business has far surpassed all expectations and its present relative growth is greater than ever before.

The subject’s son, Emmett G. McQuinn, is advertising manager and has entire charge of the fieldwork, devoting his entire attention to the details of the business.

Since becoming interested in the enterprise the subject has removed to New Castle and has attained to a high standing among the businessmen of the City.

Fraternally he is a Mason belonging to both the blue lodge and the chapter. He and his son are both men of ripe business experience and have demonstrated their fitness for the positions they occupy as the managers of the enterprise described in the foregoing lines.”

1910 – Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The Hoosier Manufacturing Company was established February 27, 1900. The citizens of New Castle offered the promoters of the enterprise two thousand dollars bonus if they would locate in this city and guarantee to employ twenty-five men eight months each year. This offer, together with the fact that New Castle offered superior shipping facilities, decided them upon this location.

The plant is located in the southern part of the city and consists of two buildings, a main building, built of brick, two stories and a basement, seventy by one hundred and forty-two feet, and a wareroom, sixty by seventy-two feet. A capital of about fifty thousand dollars is invested in the enterprise and forty-five men are employed every working day in the year, the pay-roll and expense for local material amounting to about one thousand dollars a week, all of this money going directly into local circulation. The output of the factory now amounts to nearly two hundred complete kitchen cabinets each week, and sales are made of the article in every state in the Union, and many foreign countries.

“The Hoosier Manufacturing Company stands among the best, not only on account of the amount of business transacted, but also because of the beneficent work it is doing in lightening the burdens of thousands of housewives all over the United States. The company’s motto is Steps saved in the kitchen gives woman strength and energy for other things, and in the designing of the article of kitchen furniture which they manufacture they have taken this fact into consideration and have put upon the market the most compact, convenient and best arranged kitchen cabinet ever manufactured.”