Tag Archives: vintage appliances

For Sale – Restored 1952 Coldspot Refrigerator

Jim contacted me looking for a buyer for his restored 1952 Coldspot Refrigerator. Love the “Hawaiian Aqua” paint job. Perfect for a retro
kitchen!

“Recently restored vintage 1952 Coldspot Refrigerator with built in freezer. This unit has had a new door seal and all new insulation. The handle, hinges and racks have all been triple plated with new chrome. The unit also has a new cord with a ground for safety. The box and door was taken to bare metal and painted with base/clear BASF Hawaiian Aqua striped with antique white. The fridge honestly looks better than new, as it has a real classy look to it. Perfect for a man cave, bar, game room or retro kitchen. $2500 OBO”

This sweet piece is in Indianapolis. You can contact Jim through email at wardj2320@yahoo.com or contact me at antiquevintageforum@gmail.com for more info.

UPDATE – sold on ebay

Related Articles on the Web –

From the Sears Archives – Coldspot 1928 – 1976

From the Raymond Loewy website – Coldspot 1935


Vintage Red Kitchen in Iowa




While searching on flickr for something I stumbled on to Barry and Maria Stahl’s 2008 kitchen remodel. I’m a sucker for vintage, I saw that Detroit Vapor Stove on that tile wall with 1913 and I was hooked.

“We are in New Albin, a tiny town (population about 450) at the very, very northeast corner of the state, right on the Mississippi River at the MN/IA border. The house was built in 1913, as best we can tell, so next year is its 100th birthday. It was constructed of cinderblock for the first floor and wood frame for the second. It has lots of sets of windows in sets of 3s. We have lived in the house since 2002. It’s been through many remodels and has been at various times a single family home, a boarding house, a shop and eventually home to a little old lady who blocked off the upstairs and lived in just 4 rooms of the main floor.”



In 2006 on her blog Shallow Thoughts From Iowa  Maria said about her kitchen – “horrible 1970s patterned vinyl floor covering that just about blinds you, and if it doesn’t, slowly drives you insane, a la Charlotte Perkins Gilman‘s The Yellow Wallpaper crossed with the patterned carpet at the Overlook Hotel in Stephen King’s The Shining

b) crumbling plaster and a hole where a doorway used to be (it’s only closed permanently on the other side, the kitchen side has studs)

c) the ugliest cabinets you ever did see, made of warping particle board frames and PLASTIC (yes, you read that right) drawers that are falling apart

Here’s a few pics of the kitchen before renovation.








“We had an old oil furnace that was in terrible shape. We wanted to replace it with geothermal heat, a ground source, closed loop system. We got all the quotes for it and went to the bank. The crazy thing was, it would not raise the appraised value of our house enough to justify another loan, and we didn’t have the cash. But, our banker told us, if we redid the awful kitchen, that would add enough value to justify a loan for both the kitchen and the geothermal system! So that’s what we did. I got my dream kitchen and we got a reliable, fairly “green” method of heating the house. Oh, and we got central air out of the deal, too.

The kitchen was nice and roomy, but had a total of 4 doorways, so it ended up being mostly trafficways. We closed one of the doorways, which gave us a nice big L shape along 2 walls for cabinets and fixtures. It made all the difference. I had bought a 1930s Detroit Vapor gas stove at a garage sale in Bangor, Wisconsin, years ago, and we designed the kitchen around it. It’s the second thing people exclaim over when they walk into the room, right after “Wow! Everything’s so red!”

The ceiling is now red painted beaded board, the same color as the cabinets. I’m a tall woman, 5 foot 11, so I love having high cabinets for all my treasures. I have lots of vintage enamelware and kitchen gadgets on top of the cabinets (more than in the Flickr photos, it’s really gotten kind of excessive now – ha!). It’s a very nice kitchen for 2 cooks to work, as there is plenty of counter space.

The floors are local hard maple, cut, cured and milled by our local sawmill, Konkel Hardwoods. John Pitts made the cabinets. The sink is from IKEA, and my husband did all the tile work.”














Here’s how it all came together and the “red” is fantastic! And that Detroit Vapor Stove. And all the vintage kitchen collectables on the shelves. And that “1913” tile work!!














Thanks to The Stahl’s for letting us visit your kitchen. Visit Maria’s blog Shallow Thoughts from Iowa and her site Sweet Gal Decals.




What’s Up with the Blog in 2012

Yep, the blog is a year old.

I started it, to link to my past employer Vintage Appliances .  For the same old reason, “money”,  that didn’t work out.  So here I am, a vintage appliance appraiser with the blog.

Why am I still doing it?  I don’t make much money from doing the appraisals.

I love research (yes, I’m weird).  I love and know about vintage appliances.  I love to share the information.  I love people who have and use their antique and vintage appliances.   I stuck with the blog and it grows.

What I learned –

1.   Although I love WordPress,  I would have started out on a site where I    could  advertise.  I have no clue how to change this or switch my whole blog over so it can make money. Help!

2.  When you write, people read.  I don’t consider myself a great writer but hey,  people still read the blog!  So write more often.

3.  You can really make new friends over the internet.  You never see them but they’re there.  I can’t even fathom how much help I’ve got.  Plus a free avatar design from my sweet young friend in Manhattan.  They pump you up and are there when you need moral support.

4.  One of the things I ask myself – “will I care about this a year from now”? Yes, I think I will.

So what’s next?  More appliances duh.  More editing,  more learning, more research and more vintage kitchens.

Here’s a look at our next kitchen – The 1913 Red Vintage Kitchen in Iowa



Send me pics of your kitchen or appliances or questions or ???


Update on The Hoosier Cabinet Series



I’m behind as usual. Xmas is here. Got a bunch of work in from one of my ebay clients and left The Hoosier’s in the dust. But only for a few days!

There’s so much I love about these cabinets. So many things were happening in history at the turn-of-the-century. I find it all fascinating!

In the next week I’ll take a look at The Hoosier Manufacturing Company’s Kitchen Design Book, all those great glass Hoosier jars and how they’ve become one “hot” collectable and what happened Hoosier company.

And lots and lots of pictures of Hoosier’s.

Source: youtube.com via Jan on Pinterest


Part 2 – 1900 The Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The who’s and how’s of the Hoosier Cabinet’s start are a bit conflicting.

On the youtube video we’re led to believe the Hoosier was invented by J.S. McQuinn who sold farming supplies. The dates and occupations of the owners of The Hoosier Manufacturing Company aren’t jiving for me but we’re pushing on.

I see some smart businessmen including J. S. McQuinn joining together to form the company. The stockholders and officers were: President, J. M. Maring (of Muncie); vice-president, T. F. Hart (of Muncie) and secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn.

Here’s what I found about J.S. McQuinn from Biography Of Henry County, Indiana B. F. Bowen 1920.

“The secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn, was born in Fayette County, Illinois, and was there reared and educated.

In 1886 he went to Findlay, Ohio, for the purpose of engaging in window glass manufacturing, and remained there for seven years.

In 1894 he went to Albany, Indiana, where in 1896, he organized the Albany State Bank, was elected its cashier and remained in that position for four years. While in the bank his attention was called to the kitchen cabinet and, seeing the fine opportunity open to the person who should take hold of its manufacture, he sold his interest in the bank and concentrated his energies upon the manufacture of this article.

That his judgment at that time was not at fault is attested by the wonderful success, which has attended the enterprise. The growth of the business has far surpassed all expectations and its present relative growth is greater than ever before.

The subject’s son, Emmett G. McQuinn, is advertising manager and has entire charge of the fieldwork, devoting his entire attention to the details of the business.

Since becoming interested in the enterprise the subject has removed to New Castle and has attained to a high standing among the businessmen of the City.

Fraternally he is a Mason belonging to both the blue lodge and the chapter. He and his son are both men of ripe business experience and have demonstrated their fitness for the positions they occupy as the managers of the enterprise described in the foregoing lines.”

1910 – Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The Hoosier Manufacturing Company was established February 27, 1900. The citizens of New Castle offered the promoters of the enterprise two thousand dollars bonus if they would locate in this city and guarantee to employ twenty-five men eight months each year. This offer, together with the fact that New Castle offered superior shipping facilities, decided them upon this location.

The plant is located in the southern part of the city and consists of two buildings, a main building, built of brick, two stories and a basement, seventy by one hundred and forty-two feet, and a wareroom, sixty by seventy-two feet. A capital of about fifty thousand dollars is invested in the enterprise and forty-five men are employed every working day in the year, the pay-roll and expense for local material amounting to about one thousand dollars a week, all of this money going directly into local circulation. The output of the factory now amounts to nearly two hundred complete kitchen cabinets each week, and sales are made of the article in every state in the Union, and many foreign countries.

“The Hoosier Manufacturing Company stands among the best, not only on account of the amount of business transacted, but also because of the beneficent work it is doing in lightening the burdens of thousands of housewives all over the United States. The company’s motto is Steps saved in the kitchen gives woman strength and energy for other things, and in the designing of the article of kitchen furniture which they manufacture they have taken this fact into consideration and have put upon the market the most compact, convenient and best arranged kitchen cabinet ever manufactured.”


The Hoosier Cabinet – A Culinary Work Station

Ad & Hoosier


From Indiana Public Media Article by Yaƫl Ksander

I’ve always wanted a Hoosier Cabinet (after I found out what it was). Besides being a big, honkin piece of furniture, it has a function besides hiding all your kitchen clutter.

This week we’ll journey to the land of Hoosier’s and get a glimps of how these pieces fit in the turn-of-the-century kitchen.

If your lucky enough to own one send me some pictures (I’d love to see them and will share on the blog). Send them to ramonasclutter@aol.com

1901 Hoosier Cabinet - A Kitchen Piano

1901 Hoosier Cabinet from American Vintage Home on flickr


More & More Leonard Refrigerators

Back to the Leonard story –

In 1914, Nathaniel B. Wales, a young inventor with the financial backing of Arnold Goss, then secretary of the Buick Automobile company, developed the first household mechanical refrigerators under the name “Electro-Automatic Refrigerating Company”

After producing a number of experimental models, Wales selected one for manufacturing. He then changed the company name to Kelvinator Company in honor of Lord Kelvin, the discoverer of “absolute zero” – the standard temperature basis for modern mechanical refrigeration.

To house the new electric refrigerator cooling device, Wales used the best cabinet on the market at the time – the Leonard refrigerator cabinet. By 1923, Kelvinator held 80% of the market for electric refrigerators. In 1926, Leonard merged with Kelvinator. Also in 1926, the company acquired Nizer, the largest builder of commercial ice cream cabinets marking its entry to the commercial refrigeration business.

I find it interesting that we see refrigerators, washing machines and ranges that are obviously made after 1926 with the Leonard name (rather than Kelvinator). Looks like, the Leonard brand of appliances continued to be sold exclusively through Leonard dealers, as well as through Canadian and English dealers.

art deco styled 1938? (looks older to me leonard)

leonard side by side

pink leonard


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