Tag Archives: hoosier cabinet

Part 6 – Hoosier Cabinet Jars, Hardware, Accessories & Links

Source: ijoos.com via Jan on Pinterest

I am finally over this Hoosier series. I am sure there are people, places and things I forgot. But tomorrow is the New Year and these post have to stop! I could do  a whole site on The Hoosier Cabinet.

In the late 30’s and 40’s the Hoosier lost it’s popularity.  Smaller kitchens with hanging cabinets became the rage.

I’d like a Hoosier (if I could find room in my tiny kitchen). I will continue to collect the jars –

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest

Here’s a few other links that might come in useful –

Hoosier Hardware at B & C Emporium

Source: b-c-e.biz via Jan on Pinterest

Hoosier Cabinet Dot Com

The Amish Peddler for reproductions

An end to the year, an end to the Hoosier Manufacturing Company and an end to this series!

This blog will be a year old tomorrow. Happy New Year everyone!

Advertisements

1920 The Kitchen Plan Book – Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The Kitchen Plan Book_1920_Page_01

Hoosier had a competition for the best kitchen design from 343 architects and designers in the early 1900’s. They put 50 of the plans in The Kitchen Design Book. Here are the first three, including the winner A. Thomson Thorne.

All the photos are from REVIVALthedigest on flickr

The Kitchen Plan Book

The Kitchen Plan Book

The Kitchen Plan Book

The Kitchen Plan Book


Hoosier Cabinets On Flickr

When you spend all day on the computer where do you end up?

With me it’s Flickr. I could wander all day and always find what I’m looking for.

This week it was Hoosier or Hoosier style cabinets – the Flickr photostreams have never let me down and there’s a Hoosier Cabinet group. Who knew?

Let’s look at some Hoosier’s –

From fiberartsfinatic – What great hardware!

Hoosier Cabinet

From lalapapawawa on flickr this piece is at The Marietta Museum of History in Marietta Georgia.

Detail of Hoosier Cabinet

From WayNet.org a Hoosier found in an antique store in Cambridge City, Indiana –

Hoosier Cabinet

From firexbrat a more modern design with great window detail –

Hoosier

From thors332 a beauty (love the imperfection and rooster, sweet)-

Hoosier Cabinet

I could keep going but


Part 5 – The Hoosier Manufacturing Company 1920’s

Hoosier ad in LHJ March 1930
Ladies Home Journal March 1930 from sweetgaldecals on Flickr

Source: amazon.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: slumberland.org via Jan on Pinterest

Picture from www.Slumberland.org Some great kitchen designs from 1900’s

By 1916 other manufacturers started making their own versions of Hoosier style cupboards. McDougall, Sellers, Napanee, Sears, Roebuck & Co. are just a few.

Kitchen design started changing. Paint and tile started to be used for easy cleaning. The Hoosier Cabinet worktops (originally wood) became aluminum and “porceliron” (porcelain-enameled steel), then exclusively porceliron.

Hoosier had sold over a million cabinets by the 1920’s. They expanded with tables, chairs, sideboards and a clever stool that, when flipped over, became a stepladder.

Source: swagbucks.com via Jan on Pinterest

 

 

For a dollar down and a dollar a week you could have a Hoosier Cabinet in your kitchen. If there wasn’t a dealer near you, they’d deliver. They had a Hoosier Cabinet Club you could join, a kitchen plan book (free with purchase),  a Hoosier Council of Kitchen Scientists. These people were advertising masters.

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest


Part 4 – Hoosier Cabinet Ads

It seems Emmett G. McQuinn (son of J.M. McQuinn) was in charge of the advertising and marketing. What a fine job he did! You can see The Hoosier all over the place – Ladies Home Journal, House Beautiful and in images in cook books and kitchen designs.

Source: chestofbooks.com via Jan on Pinterest



“Kitchen Patriotism Demands a Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet

WITHOUT the strong right arm of the Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet no woman can do her full bit in saving food for our nation’s fighters. Nor can she save extra hours, extra steps, and extra effort in her kitchen work. The many time, food and labor-saving features of the Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet together with the valuable kitchen short-cuts invented by the talented women who compose the Hoosier Council of Kitchen Scientists have made the Hoosier a kitchen necessity – not a luxury.

See these Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets at the Hoosier dealer’s in your city. Learn for yourself how the Hoosier saves you food, time and labor. Then you will never be content without one.

The Hoosier Manufacturing Co., New Castle, Ind.”

Source: atticpaper.com via Jan on Pinterest

1912 Ad

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest



From – Robinson’s Antiques where you can get reproduction and old labels

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest


What to Look for when Purchasing a Hoosier

Another great video from youtube –

Source: youtube.com via Jan on Pinterest


Part 3 – The Look and Design of The American Hoosier Cabinet


1905 Hoosier Ad (above from http://tennessee.inetgiant.com/nashville/addetails/hoosier-cabinet-s-springfield/13379535)- shows accessories and how the Hoosier was used

Early 1900’s Hoosier from an article by Marye Audet

What exactly is a Hoosier cabinet? I love the term “a culinary work-station”. It allowed owners to maintain an efficient and clutter-free kitchen by centralizing utensils, cookware, tools, and ingredients all the while providing a space in which to prepare the meals of the day. A true modern American innovation of the turn-of-the century.

The Hoosier takes the design idea from what was known as a baker’s cabinet.

The basic wood piece has an upper and lower cabinet. These had closing cupboards and drawers for storage. There were often “possum belly” drawers to hold flour and sugar. These drawers would be of tin to protect the contents from pests.

The lower section usually had a waist height pull out cutting or pastry board. The counter top was first made of wood, and then metal (zinc, aluminum or porcelain).

The most fantastic thing are the accessories. Flour sifters, bread drawers lined with enamel, bread boards, storage containers, different racks and hooks, salt and peppers, ironing boards and broom closets.

 

 

Hoosier also used glass from Sneath Glass Company to make jars. The earlier glass canisters were squarer in shape. During the early 1920s the shapes became more rounded. As time went on more additions were made to make the cabinet more efficient. Ironing boards, umbrella stands and other additions were created as the manufacturers’ imaginations soared.

Once the Hoosier cabinet took off the company built over four million cabinets between 1900 and 1940. Other companies started building their own styles and many were being home made by cabinet makers.

Who made them doesn’t matter, they all have been termed as “The Hoosier Cabinet”.