Tag Archives: antiques

Out and About – Tucson Early Morning Yard Sale

Sear's Harmony House Melmac

Due to my dear son getting a vehicle TOWED I haven’t drove a car in 50 days.

Looking back on the 50 days is rough. I had insomnia, started drinking and thought I could seriously DIE.  I’m 56 and have been driving every day of my life for 40 years!

Depending on someone to give you a “lift” is definitely a “downer”. I seriously had the thought – “I’m never going to drive a car again. I’ll have to learn to take the bus, I’m joining AARP and going to like it (no matter what)”.

WHY we have two vehicles with stick shifts, I don’t know. Why I can’t get off my f… lazy a… and learn how to drive a stick shift, I don’t know.

Back to my first yard sale in 50 days –

Set of Melamine, Melmac $2.00 – (“it ain’t me babe, no-no-no it ain’t me babe…it ain’t me you’re looking for babe”)

Ice-O-Matic (love the name, love the look) – $2.00

Red Willow Ware Bowl – $1.00 (come on give me strength)

While we’re on a red roll, what about this Vintage Purse made in British Columbia. It’s a kind-of a Vintage Trailer-Trash piece. Plastickey coated, some kind-of wickery something, that’s RED.

Spent $12.00. There’s more but I’m done. Moving on .

Meatball Subs and Mickey’s. One more day until my daughter and grand daughter move out. SAD but GLORIOUS!

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A Little Vintage Red for the Kitchen



Happy Valentine’s Day!

About RED – Red is the warmest of all colors. Red is the color most chosen by extroverts and one of the top picks of males. On the negative side red can mean temper or anger. In China, red is the color of prosperity and joy. Brides wear red and front doors are often painted red. Red is Tuesday’s color. Red roses symbolize passionate love. Ruby rings should be worn on the left hand. Red is the color of Mars. This planet is known as the God of War.
Red Energy

Red is associated with fiery heat and warmth. It can also mean danger (burning).

Red is the color of blood, and as such has strong symbolism as life and vitality. It brings focus to the essence of life and living with emphasis on survival. Red is also the color of passion and lust.







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Part 4 – Hoosier Cabinet Ads

It seems Emmett G. McQuinn (son of J.M. McQuinn) was in charge of the advertising and marketing. What a fine job he did! You can see The Hoosier all over the place – Ladies Home Journal, House Beautiful and in images in cook books and kitchen designs.

Source: chestofbooks.com via Jan on Pinterest



“Kitchen Patriotism Demands a Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet

WITHOUT the strong right arm of the Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet no woman can do her full bit in saving food for our nation’s fighters. Nor can she save extra hours, extra steps, and extra effort in her kitchen work. The many time, food and labor-saving features of the Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet together with the valuable kitchen short-cuts invented by the talented women who compose the Hoosier Council of Kitchen Scientists have made the Hoosier a kitchen necessity – not a luxury.

See these Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets at the Hoosier dealer’s in your city. Learn for yourself how the Hoosier saves you food, time and labor. Then you will never be content without one.

The Hoosier Manufacturing Co., New Castle, Ind.”

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1912 Ad

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From – Robinson’s Antiques where you can get reproduction and old labels

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What to Look for when Purchasing a Hoosier

Another great video from youtube –

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Part 3 – The Look and Design of The American Hoosier Cabinet


1905 Hoosier Ad (above from http://tennessee.inetgiant.com/nashville/addetails/hoosier-cabinet-s-springfield/13379535)- shows accessories and how the Hoosier was used

Early 1900’s Hoosier from an article by Marye Audet

What exactly is a Hoosier cabinet? I love the term “a culinary work-station”. It allowed owners to maintain an efficient and clutter-free kitchen by centralizing utensils, cookware, tools, and ingredients all the while providing a space in which to prepare the meals of the day. A true modern American innovation of the turn-of-the century.

The Hoosier takes the design idea from what was known as a baker’s cabinet.

The basic wood piece has an upper and lower cabinet. These had closing cupboards and drawers for storage. There were often “possum belly” drawers to hold flour and sugar. These drawers would be of tin to protect the contents from pests.

The lower section usually had a waist height pull out cutting or pastry board. The counter top was first made of wood, and then metal (zinc, aluminum or porcelain).

The most fantastic thing are the accessories. Flour sifters, bread drawers lined with enamel, bread boards, storage containers, different racks and hooks, salt and peppers, ironing boards and broom closets.

 

 

Hoosier also used glass from Sneath Glass Company to make jars. The earlier glass canisters were squarer in shape. During the early 1920s the shapes became more rounded. As time went on more additions were made to make the cabinet more efficient. Ironing boards, umbrella stands and other additions were created as the manufacturers’ imaginations soared.

Once the Hoosier cabinet took off the company built over four million cabinets between 1900 and 1940. Other companies started building their own styles and many were being home made by cabinet makers.

Who made them doesn’t matter, they all have been termed as “The Hoosier Cabinet”.


Part 2 – 1900 The Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The who’s and how’s of the Hoosier Cabinet’s start are a bit conflicting.

On the youtube video we’re led to believe the Hoosier was invented by J.S. McQuinn who sold farming supplies. The dates and occupations of the owners of The Hoosier Manufacturing Company aren’t jiving for me but we’re pushing on.

I see some smart businessmen including J. S. McQuinn joining together to form the company. The stockholders and officers were: President, J. M. Maring (of Muncie); vice-president, T. F. Hart (of Muncie) and secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn.

Here’s what I found about J.S. McQuinn from Biography Of Henry County, Indiana B. F. Bowen 1920.

“The secretary and treasurer, J. S. McQuinn, was born in Fayette County, Illinois, and was there reared and educated.

In 1886 he went to Findlay, Ohio, for the purpose of engaging in window glass manufacturing, and remained there for seven years.

In 1894 he went to Albany, Indiana, where in 1896, he organized the Albany State Bank, was elected its cashier and remained in that position for four years. While in the bank his attention was called to the kitchen cabinet and, seeing the fine opportunity open to the person who should take hold of its manufacture, he sold his interest in the bank and concentrated his energies upon the manufacture of this article.

That his judgment at that time was not at fault is attested by the wonderful success, which has attended the enterprise. The growth of the business has far surpassed all expectations and its present relative growth is greater than ever before.

The subject’s son, Emmett G. McQuinn, is advertising manager and has entire charge of the fieldwork, devoting his entire attention to the details of the business.

Since becoming interested in the enterprise the subject has removed to New Castle and has attained to a high standing among the businessmen of the City.

Fraternally he is a Mason belonging to both the blue lodge and the chapter. He and his son are both men of ripe business experience and have demonstrated their fitness for the positions they occupy as the managers of the enterprise described in the foregoing lines.”

1910 – Hoosier Manufacturing Company

The Hoosier Manufacturing Company was established February 27, 1900. The citizens of New Castle offered the promoters of the enterprise two thousand dollars bonus if they would locate in this city and guarantee to employ twenty-five men eight months each year. This offer, together with the fact that New Castle offered superior shipping facilities, decided them upon this location.

The plant is located in the southern part of the city and consists of two buildings, a main building, built of brick, two stories and a basement, seventy by one hundred and forty-two feet, and a wareroom, sixty by seventy-two feet. A capital of about fifty thousand dollars is invested in the enterprise and forty-five men are employed every working day in the year, the pay-roll and expense for local material amounting to about one thousand dollars a week, all of this money going directly into local circulation. The output of the factory now amounts to nearly two hundred complete kitchen cabinets each week, and sales are made of the article in every state in the Union, and many foreign countries.

“The Hoosier Manufacturing Company stands among the best, not only on account of the amount of business transacted, but also because of the beneficent work it is doing in lightening the burdens of thousands of housewives all over the United States. The company’s motto is Steps saved in the kitchen gives woman strength and energy for other things, and in the designing of the article of kitchen furniture which they manufacture they have taken this fact into consideration and have put upon the market the most compact, convenient and best arranged kitchen cabinet ever manufactured.”


The Hoosier Cabinet – A Culinary Work Station

Ad & Hoosier


From Indiana Public Media Article by Yaël Ksander

I’ve always wanted a Hoosier Cabinet (after I found out what it was). Besides being a big, honkin piece of furniture, it has a function besides hiding all your kitchen clutter.

This week we’ll journey to the land of Hoosier’s and get a glimps of how these pieces fit in the turn-of-the-century kitchen.

If your lucky enough to own one send me some pictures (I’d love to see them and will share on the blog). Send them to ramonasclutter@aol.com

1901 Hoosier Cabinet - A Kitchen Piano

1901 Hoosier Cabinet from American Vintage Home on flickr