Tag Archives: antique appliances

A Little Vintage Red for the Kitchen



Happy Valentine’s Day!

About RED – Red is the warmest of all colors. Red is the color most chosen by extroverts and one of the top picks of males. On the negative side red can mean temper or anger. In China, red is the color of prosperity and joy. Brides wear red and front doors are often painted red. Red is Tuesday’s color. Red roses symbolize passionate love. Ruby rings should be worn on the left hand. Red is the color of Mars. This planet is known as the God of War.
Red Energy

Red is associated with fiery heat and warmth. It can also mean danger (burning).

Red is the color of blood, and as such has strong symbolism as life and vitality. It brings focus to the essence of life and living with emphasis on survival. Red is also the color of passion and lust.







Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: manolohome.com via Jan on Pinterest



Source: Uploaded by user via Jan on Pinterest







Source: bing.com via Jan on Pinterest


What’s Up with the Blog in 2012

Yep, the blog is a year old.

I started it, to link to my past employer Vintage Appliances .  For the same old reason, “money”,  that didn’t work out.  So here I am, a vintage appliance appraiser with the blog.

Why am I still doing it?  I don’t make much money from doing the appraisals.

I love research (yes, I’m weird).  I love and know about vintage appliances.  I love to share the information.  I love people who have and use their antique and vintage appliances.   I stuck with the blog and it grows.

What I learned –

1.   Although I love WordPress,  I would have started out on a site where I    could  advertise.  I have no clue how to change this or switch my whole blog over so it can make money. Help!

2.  When you write, people read.  I don’t consider myself a great writer but hey,  people still read the blog!  So write more often.

3.  You can really make new friends over the internet.  You never see them but they’re there.  I can’t even fathom how much help I’ve got.  Plus a free avatar design from my sweet young friend in Manhattan.  They pump you up and are there when you need moral support.

4.  One of the things I ask myself – “will I care about this a year from now”? Yes, I think I will.

So what’s next?  More appliances duh.  More editing,  more learning, more research and more vintage kitchens.

Here’s a look at our next kitchen – The 1913 Red Vintage Kitchen in Iowa



Send me pics of your kitchen or appliances or questions or ???


Hoosier Cabinets On Flickr

When you spend all day on the computer where do you end up?

With me it’s Flickr. I could wander all day and always find what I’m looking for.

This week it was Hoosier or Hoosier style cabinets – the Flickr photostreams have never let me down and there’s a Hoosier Cabinet group. Who knew?

Let’s look at some Hoosier’s –

From fiberartsfinatic – What great hardware!

Hoosier Cabinet

From lalapapawawa on flickr this piece is at The Marietta Museum of History in Marietta Georgia.

Detail of Hoosier Cabinet

From WayNet.org a Hoosier found in an antique store in Cambridge City, Indiana –

Hoosier Cabinet

From firexbrat a more modern design with great window detail –

Hoosier

From thors332 a beauty (love the imperfection and rooster, sweet)-

Hoosier Cabinet

I could keep going but


Update on The Hoosier Cabinet Series



I’m behind as usual. Xmas is here. Got a bunch of work in from one of my ebay clients and left The Hoosier’s in the dust. But only for a few days!

There’s so much I love about these cabinets. So many things were happening in history at the turn-of-the-century. I find it all fascinating!

In the next week I’ll take a look at The Hoosier Manufacturing Company’s Kitchen Design Book, all those great glass Hoosier jars and how they’ve become one “hot” collectable and what happened Hoosier company.

And lots and lots of pictures of Hoosier’s.

Source: youtube.com via Jan on Pinterest


Part 1 – The Housier Cabinet 1890’s Kitchen

1890 Wash Day photo from http://www.explorepahistory.com

[Woman and man sit in Walt Whi... Digital ID: 1636029. New York Public Library Picture from the New York Public Library – woman and man sit in Walt Whitman farmhouse kitchen

From Mattapoisett Historical Society

Before I venture on to The Hoosier Cabinet, I wanted to take a look at a typical kitchen and what a woman’s life was like in 1890.

Respectability was measured by cleanliness. For the turn-of-century woman appearances were everything: hands, faces, outer clothing, doorsteps and entrances were suppose to be kept spotless, as were reputations.

Women who worked on the farm had a damn hard life – canning, butchering, sewing and mending, baking and cooking, keeping the stove hot all day, laundering, sweeping the chimney, filling the gas and oil lamps, hauling water and tending the garden and the children. Before modern detergents it could take a day to clean one room thoroughly. Laundry work took up 3 – 4 days every fortnight. Give me a break! It’s no wonder 47 was considered old age!

Leisure time for a wife at least was at a premium and religion could play a large part, with many Methodists for example expected to attend chapel twice a day on a Sunday and at least one class during the week. This was often impossible in a larger family (many women were pregnant on average every 18 months and 8 – 10 children were not uncommon with 2 – 3 probably dead in their early years) were most women (unless they could afford a nurse) were almost continually nursing a baby or sick child.

Although rather hidden, evidence is slowly emerging that many women of the time were often ill or depressed (no frickin wonder) for much of their lives, with only minimal treatments available.

The middle class had it a bit easier – maybe a servant or two, a wet sink, a cook stove, ice-chest refrigeration [1890-1922]. By 1915
electric refrigeration furnished the homes of the wealthy, but the middle-class would not see truly modern refrigerators until 1922.

Magnolia Manor in Cairo, Illinois

A perfect sized Victorian (which I consider a upper-middle class) kitchen was thought to be 15′ X 17′. Big enough for movement but not too large. It contained a sink, stove, tables, dresser and hopefully connected to a pantry, cold room or a cellar.

Victorian Kitchen

Hard wood floors, washable or tiled surfaces, an iron sink, a portable stove rather than a set range, additional tables and a pump or running water were things every home maker yearn for.

Below is a photo of a woman’s tenement kitchen.

In 1863, New York City conducted the first sanitary survey. New York’s Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor (est. 1844) finds “dark, contracted, ill constructed, badly ventilated and disgustingly filthy” housing. Some 18,000 people live in cellar apartments whose floors are putrid mud.”

While doing research for this post I feel nauseous. The more I read, the more disgusted I am. Woman had no rights, no votes and I’m moving on to The Hoosier Cabinet before I throw up.


The Hoosier Cabinet – A Culinary Work Station

Ad & Hoosier


From Indiana Public Media Article by Yaël Ksander

I’ve always wanted a Hoosier Cabinet (after I found out what it was). Besides being a big, honkin piece of furniture, it has a function besides hiding all your kitchen clutter.

This week we’ll journey to the land of Hoosier’s and get a glimps of how these pieces fit in the turn-of-the-century kitchen.

If your lucky enough to own one send me some pictures (I’d love to see them and will share on the blog). Send them to ramonasclutter@aol.com

1901 Hoosier Cabinet - A Kitchen Piano

1901 Hoosier Cabinet from American Vintage Home on flickr


The Chambers Stove – Lovely Models All in a Row

Chambers Stove Model 2741
Early B Model Chambers Stove
Chambers Stove 003
23
After Kitchen 2
Chambers Stove
Chambers cook stove just like Rachel Ray
Kitchen and Chambers Stove
Chambers Stove & Oven 1 - 1970