Category Archives: vintage stoves

1950’s Kelvinator Stove For Sale $500.00 – Denver, Colorado

Jim emailed me last week about finding out some information on his 1950’s 30″ Kelvinator electric stove. (The 30″ standard size vintage stoves aren’t as easy to come by as the larger stoves of era).

It’s up for sale for $500.00 in Denver, Colorado.

Jim says, “It was purchased new in the 1950’s and put in service. The original owner sold the house including appliances to a single woman in the mid 1960’s.

The range has had two owners, we are now the third.”

This vintage range is in fantastic condition and has been working for all these years. It has the broiler in the oven and a utility drawer on the bottom.

I like it because it has the extra work space in the middle and is a simple, classic style which is easy to maintain.

This stove looks to be a 1952 or there abouts. Here’s a few ads I found on the web –

From Farm Home Life

And this 1952 ad from hmdavid on flickr –

Kelvinator Oven Ad 1952

You can contact Jim at jrpeay@vantageco.net or me at antiquevintage forum@gmail.com for more information.

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Kitchen Photos during The Depression

As we struggle through hard economic times, let’s not forget ….some haunting photo’s from The Library of Congress.

Source: loc.gov via Jan on Pinterest


Part of the L.H. Nissen family of ten living in a three-room shack. Rest of family at school. The whole house was of unusually high humidity. The wife said they could not dry out the bedding because of the poor ventilation. This is the living room and kitchen combined. Iowa

Source: loc.gov via Jan on Pinterest



Negro’s kitchen, Washington, D.C. Kitchen in Negro home near Union Station (wording from the Library of Congress not me!)

Source: loc.gov via Jan on Pinterest



Tenement Kitchen

Source: loc.gov via Jan on Pinterest



1939 – Child of white migrant adding water to boiling beans on stove which was set up immediately after reaching camping grounds near Harlingen, Texas

Source: loc.gov via Jan on Pinterest



1936 Kitchen of Ozarks cabin


Vintage Stove Parts – 54monroe

OK people! I’m done with blogging about Vintage White Kitchens (for a bit). Let’s move on to some vintage appliance stuff.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



Gaffers and Sattler Stove Knobs

Today on ebay I found a great resource for vintage appliance parts, 54monroe. First I looked at his feedback – looked great. Then I browsed his inventory. Good selection of knobs, grates, griddles, switches and controls clocks and more.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



O’Keefe and Merritt Burner Grates

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



Chamber’s Stove Therm-o-Well 1/2 Pan

The more, might be this 1950’s O’Keefe and Merritt for $249.00 Buy It Now. Lovin that yellow. Lovin that price.

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest



I needed to find out more so I sent him a message. Here’s what Steve wrote back – “As you see i have a little bit of everything and a whole lot of some stuff. My eBay store is VINTAGE STOVE PARTS and I have a one page info only web site www.vintagestoveparts.com

I am in the Los Angeles area and have been selling appliance parts for 35 years and collecting stoves since 1990. I have about 30 gas stoves.

I have been on eBay about 3 years. I have not been parting out my collection to auction off in pieces…all the items I have are on the shelf.

I have mostly O’Keefe & Merritt, Wedgewood, Chambers, Magic Chef and Tappan on the gas ranges. Frigidaire, GE, Tappan and Thermador on the electric.

Steve also sent me a picture of one of my favorites. A 1939 6301 Magic Chef. It is a to-die-for stove. 8 burners, multiple ovens and that sweet bread warming cubby at the top.

Here’s what’s on his website – If you don’t find what you need in my Store please email me with your request.Include clear photos. I list only a few of the items I have available for sale and have a huge inventory ready to ship. Please try to request only non-eBay items. I do not end eBay auctions early or sell eBay items direct. Local pick up available for Southern California customers. Email me at okmguy@yahoo.com

Glad I found him. I know everyone is always looking for those “hard-to-find” parts.

Here’s a picture one of Steve’s other stove, an O’Keefe and Merritt. It’s a beauty.


Vintage Red Kitchen in Iowa




While searching on flickr for something I stumbled on to Barry and Maria Stahl’s 2008 kitchen remodel. I’m a sucker for vintage, I saw that Detroit Vapor Stove on that tile wall with 1913 and I was hooked.

“We are in New Albin, a tiny town (population about 450) at the very, very northeast corner of the state, right on the Mississippi River at the MN/IA border. The house was built in 1913, as best we can tell, so next year is its 100th birthday. It was constructed of cinderblock for the first floor and wood frame for the second. It has lots of sets of windows in sets of 3s. We have lived in the house since 2002. It’s been through many remodels and has been at various times a single family home, a boarding house, a shop and eventually home to a little old lady who blocked off the upstairs and lived in just 4 rooms of the main floor.”



In 2006 on her blog Shallow Thoughts From Iowa  Maria said about her kitchen – “horrible 1970s patterned vinyl floor covering that just about blinds you, and if it doesn’t, slowly drives you insane, a la Charlotte Perkins Gilman‘s The Yellow Wallpaper crossed with the patterned carpet at the Overlook Hotel in Stephen King’s The Shining

b) crumbling plaster and a hole where a doorway used to be (it’s only closed permanently on the other side, the kitchen side has studs)

c) the ugliest cabinets you ever did see, made of warping particle board frames and PLASTIC (yes, you read that right) drawers that are falling apart

Here’s a few pics of the kitchen before renovation.








“We had an old oil furnace that was in terrible shape. We wanted to replace it with geothermal heat, a ground source, closed loop system. We got all the quotes for it and went to the bank. The crazy thing was, it would not raise the appraised value of our house enough to justify another loan, and we didn’t have the cash. But, our banker told us, if we redid the awful kitchen, that would add enough value to justify a loan for both the kitchen and the geothermal system! So that’s what we did. I got my dream kitchen and we got a reliable, fairly “green” method of heating the house. Oh, and we got central air out of the deal, too.

The kitchen was nice and roomy, but had a total of 4 doorways, so it ended up being mostly trafficways. We closed one of the doorways, which gave us a nice big L shape along 2 walls for cabinets and fixtures. It made all the difference. I had bought a 1930s Detroit Vapor gas stove at a garage sale in Bangor, Wisconsin, years ago, and we designed the kitchen around it. It’s the second thing people exclaim over when they walk into the room, right after “Wow! Everything’s so red!”

The ceiling is now red painted beaded board, the same color as the cabinets. I’m a tall woman, 5 foot 11, so I love having high cabinets for all my treasures. I have lots of vintage enamelware and kitchen gadgets on top of the cabinets (more than in the Flickr photos, it’s really gotten kind of excessive now – ha!). It’s a very nice kitchen for 2 cooks to work, as there is plenty of counter space.

The floors are local hard maple, cut, cured and milled by our local sawmill, Konkel Hardwoods. John Pitts made the cabinets. The sink is from IKEA, and my husband did all the tile work.”














Here’s how it all came together and the “red” is fantastic! And that Detroit Vapor Stove. And all the vintage kitchen collectables on the shelves. And that “1913” tile work!!














Thanks to The Stahl’s for letting us visit your kitchen. Visit Maria’s blog Shallow Thoughts from Iowa and her site Sweet Gal Decals.




The Detroit Vapor Stove Company

Source: quod.lib.umich.edu via Jan on Pinterest      

Heintz House and Detroit Vapor Stove Co. on Franklin; c.1905






Sorry, it’s been so long. Holidays, birthdays and vacations are officially over. Back to the blog and The Detroit Vapor.

At the turn-of-the-century Detroit was pumping out the stoves. In 1922 Detroit makers built 400,000 stoves worth $10 million in one year.

These were the biggeys – The Michigan Stove Company, The Detroit Stove Works, The Penninsular Stove Company, the Art Stove Company, and the Detroit Vapor Stove Company.




Yes, there really stoves called a “vapor stove”. These stoves burned “stove gasoline,” a crude form of the fuel. Vapor stoves could burn multiple fuels that also included kerosene, a type of oil, or a fuel called “distillate”.




Here’s a vapor stove ad and a great article Late 19th-Century Gasoline Stoves – Cooking on a Bomb Used to be Normal

Source: flickr.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: ebay.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: google.com via Jan on Pinterest


Holly Abston in Romantic Country Magazine

My Vintage Kitchen Stove (chambers c model) when we first built, we've upgraded the counters since.

Last year I did a post about artist, Holly Abston’s darling jadeite kitchen.

I found Holly’s fabulous kitchen while searching for Chambers stoves. She has a beauty!

Her darling house and art was featured in the spring edition of the 2012 Romantic Country Magazine. On sale now.

Congratulations Holly. Still lovin that stove!

Source: hollyabston.com via Jan on Pinterest

Source: hollyabston.com via Jan on Pinterest

Visit Holly’s site www.hollyabston.com for a look into her beautiful world and illustrations!


A No Name 60’s Mystery Stove

I was contacted me about a week ago inquiring about a range he couldn’t find any information on. Here’s some pictures –

We have a model and serial number but no manufacturer. No names on the clock. How can I give this nice man an appraisal on this “little gem”?

I spent some time Googling the model number + mid-century stove. Nothing, and I ended up on science websites with lots of numbers and other things way beyond my intellect. Then did “mid-century stainless steel stove”. Here’s a neat Kenmore I found on Retro Renovation. The “mystery stove” looks a bit older to me. –

The stove is being restored and needs parts to get in in working condition. At first look, I thought Tappan. Went over to one of my favorite sites Tappan Talk and found this stainless piece. OK, in 1959 we start to see that “modern” look with stainless and squared corners.

1959 Stainless Tappan Wall Oven

Back to google – let’s try 1959 stoves. From imgfave a cute lady in a bunny costume in an appliance store, OK??

The search has ended when the man with the stove went to The Old Appliance Club. A great place for info and parts!

It’s a 1965 Kelvinator. Who knew?

Kelvinator is an appliance company owned by Electrolux of Sweden since 1986. It takes its name from William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, who developed the concept of absolute zero and for whom the Kelvin temperature scale is named. The name was thought appropriate for a company that manufactured ice-boxes and domestic refrigerators.

Kelvinator was founded in 1914, in Detroit; in 1926 it acquired Leonard, which had been founded in 1881. In 1928, George W. Mason assummed control of Kelvinator; under his leadership the company lowered its costs while increasing market share through 1936.

On January 4, 1937, the company merged with Nash Motors to form Nash-Kelvinator Corporation as part of a deal that placed Mason at the helm of the combined company. In 1952 it acquired the Altorfer Bros. Company, which made home laundry equipment under the ABC brand name.

Nash-Kelvinator became a division of American Motors Corporation when Nash merged with Hudson in 1954. Kelvinator introduced the first model frost-free side-by-side refrigerator in the early 1950s. In the 1960s, Kelvinator refrigerators introduced “picture frame” doors on some models allowing owners to decorate their appliance to match décor of their kitchens.

Acquired from AMC by White Consolidated Industries in 1968, Kelvinator joined a company that had acquired the rights to Frigidaire (formerly owned by General Motors), Gibson, Tappan and White-Westinghouse product lines. In the early 1990s, the name of the Dublin, Ohio based holding company changed to Frigidaire Company. In 1986, Frigidaire Corporation was acquired by Sweden’s Electrolux.